WEB SERVERS

A Web Server is a Computer or Combination of computers, which is connected through internet or intranet to serve the clients quests, coming from their web browser. It is a large repository of web pages which transfer to the client in response to their request. The client request to the server through protocol such as FTP, HTTP, SMTP etc for their own specific use. Every web server has a unique IP address and domain name which identifies that machine on the network. A server contains the server software installed on it, which manages the client request and response them.

web-servers-opensource-pic1A Web server is a system that delivers content or services to end users over the Internet. A Web server consists of a physical server, server operating system (OS) and software used to facilitate HTTP communication. A Web server is also known as an Internet server.

The most simple definition is that a Web server runs a website by returning HTML files over an HTTP connection. This definition may have been true in the early days of the Internet, but the line has blurred between websites, Web applications and Web services, etc. For example, a server that delivers an XML document to another device can be a Web server. A better definition might be that a Web server is any Internet server that responds to HTTP requests to deliver content and services.

Depending on context, the term can refer to the hardware or Web server software on the server. For example, saying that you have “10 Web servers at the Web farm” is just as accurate as, “The IIS Web server is on the machine that has 32 GB of RAM.”

In terms of software, there have been literally hundreds of Web servers over the years, but Apache and Microsoft’s IIS have emerged as two of the most popular systems.

Here are some advantages of using a web server within your development environment:

  • Your local website behaves more like the live one. For example, you can configure directory security, test your custom error pages etc before commiting them to the production environment.
  • You can use server-side scripting languages such as PHP and ColdFusion.
  • Allows you to standardize your coding. For example, you can use root-relative paths for your image references and hyperlinks (i.e. “/directory/image.gif”). In other words, your paths can represent the website structure, rather than the directory structure of your computer.

 The knowledge you gain from using your own web server will help you understand how it works in the live environment. This will most certainly help you when you need to communicate with your hosting provider – you’ll be able to use terminology that makes it easier for them to understand your request/issue.

A Web server is a system that delivers content or services to end users over the Internet. A Web server consists of a physical server, server operating system (OS) and software used to facilitate HTTP communication. A Web server is also known as an Internet server.

The most simple definition is that a Web server runs a website by returning HTML files over an HTTP connection. This definition may have been true in the early days of the Internet, but the line has blurred between websites, Web applications and Web services, etc. For example, a server that delivers an XML document to another device can be a Web server. A better definition might be that a Web server is any Internet server that responds to HTTP requests to deliver content and services.

Depending on context, the term can refer to the hardware or Web server software on the server. For example, saying that you have “10 Web servers at the Web farm” is just as accurate as, “The IIS Web server is on the machine that has 32 GB of RAM.”

In terms of software, there have been literally hundreds of Web servers over the years, but Apache and Microsoft’s IIS have emerged as two of the most popular systems.

Here are some advantages of using a web server within your development environment:

  • Your local website behaves more like the live one. For example, you can configure directory security, test your custom error pages etc before commiting them to the production environment.
  • You can use server-side scripting languages such as PHP and ColdFusion.
  • Allows you to standardize your coding. For example, you can use root-relative paths for your image references and hyperlinks (i.e. “/directory/image.gif”). In other words, your paths can represent the website structure, rather than the directory structure of your computer.

 The knowledge you gain from using your own web server will help you understand how it works in the live environment. This will most certainly help you when you need to communicate with your hosting provider – you’ll be able to use terminology that makes it easier for them to understand your request/issue.

Content credit: TUBIDY